Land Education: Rethinking Pedagogies of Place from Indigenous, Postcolonial, and Decolonizing Perspectives

Edited by Kate McCoy, Eve Tuck & Marcia McKenzie

Routledge, 2016

 

This important book on Land Education offers critical analysis of the paths forward for education on Indigenous land. This analysis discusses the necessity of centring historical and current contexts of colonization in education on and in relation to land. In addition, contributors explore the intersections of environmentalism and Indigenous rights, in part inspired by the realisation that the specifics of geography and community matter for how environmental education can be engaged.

This edited volume suggests how place-based pedagogies can respond to issues of colonialism and Indigenous sovereignty. Through dynamic new empirical and conceptual studies, international contributors examine settler colonialism, Indigenous cosmologies, Indigenous land rights, and language as key aspects of Land Education. The book invites readers to rethink 'pedagogies of place' from various Indigenous, postcolonial, and decolonizing perspectives. This book was originally published as a special issue of Environmental Education Research.

 

Place in Research

Eve Tuck and Marcia McKenzie

Routledge, 2015

*Now available in paperback!*

Google books preview

Bridging environmental and Indigenous studies and drawing on critical geography, spatial theory, new materialist theory, and decolonizing theory, this dynamic volume examines the sometimes overlooked significance of place in social science research. There are often important divergences and even competing logics at work in these areas of research, some which may indeed be incommensurable. This volume explores how researchers around the globe are coming to terms – both theoretically and practically – with place in the context of settler colonialism, globalization, and environmental degradation. Tuck and McKenzie outline a trajectory of critical place inquiry that not only furthers empirical knowledge, but ethically imagines new possibilities for collaboration and action.

Critical place inquiry can involve a range of research methodologies; this volume argues that what matters is how the chosen methodology engages conceptually with place in order to mobilize methods that enable data collection and analyses that address place explicitly and politically. Unlike other approaches that attempt to superficially tag on Indigenous concerns, decolonizing conceptualizations of land and place and Indigenous methods are central, not peripheral, to practices of critical place inquiry.

Youth Resistance Research and Theories of Change

Edited by Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang

Routledge, 2014

Description

Youth resistance has become a pressing global phenomenon, to which many educators and researchers have looked for inspiration and/or with chagrin. Although the topic of much discussion and debate, it remains dramatically under-theorized, particularly in terms of theories of change. Resistance has been a prominent concern of educational research for several decades, yet understandings of youth resistance frequently lack complexity, often seize upon convenient examples to confirm entrenched ideas about social change, and overly regulate what “counts” as progress. As this comprehensive volume illustrates, understanding and researching youth resistance requires much more than a one-dimensional theory.

Youth Resistance Research and Theories of Change provides readers with new ways to see and engage youth resistance to educational injustices. This volume features interviews with prominent theorists, including Signithia Fordham, James C. Scott, Michelle Fine, Robin D.G. Kelley, Gerald Vizenor, and Pedro Noguera, reflecting on their own work in light of contemporary uprisings, neoliberal crises, and the impact of new technologies globally. Chapters presenting new studies in youth resistance exemplify approaches which move beyond calcified theories of resistance. Essays on needed interventions to youth resistance research provide guidance for further study. As a whole, this rich volume challenges current thinking on resistance, and extends new trajectories for research, collaboration, and justice.

Editorial reviews

“This cogent, rich, and multi-voiced volume advances the field of resistance theory by countering attempts in mainstream scholarship to domesticate youth resistance under the banner of such terms as ‘empowerment’ or ‘civic participation.’ It faces squarely the messiness of resistance by illuminating its complexities, contradictions, tensions, and dilemmas in ways that both honor and deepen our understanding of youth’s acts of agency.  Kudos to Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang for a bold and courageous text!”—Angela Valenzuela, author of Subtractive Schooling and Leaving Children Behind, College of Education, University of Texas at Austin

“The passion, clarity, and diversity of thought offered here powerfully signal new possibilities for how educators can critically comprehend conditions of educational injustice and the vital role youth resistance plays in the process of transformation. In contrast to the disrespect and hopelessness often attributed to youth in schools, these essays speak volumes to the formidable strength and courage of students, who despite potential risks, rise up valiantly to oppose colonizing educational practices that threaten their humanity.  Most importantly, the book challenges one-dimensional notions of youth and resistance by rethinking structural complexities so often ignored. It is truly a must read.”—Antonia Darder, Leavey Endowed Chair in Ethics and Moral Leadership, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles

“Tuck and Yang’s Youth Resistance Research and Theories of Change could not have come at a better time. Public education, our youth, and communities of color have come under assault from an onslaught of neoliberal education and public policy reforms. This book not only helps us understand resistance in more complex and powerful ways, it points to the critical role of youth in building, activating, and sustaining social justice movements in the 21st century.”—Wayne Au, editor for Rethinking Schools and Associate Professor of Education, University of Washington-Bothell

http://www.amazon.com/Urban-Youth-School-Pushout-Get-aways/dp/0415886090/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1434395074&sr=8-1&keywords=urban+youth+an+school+pushout

Urban Youth and School Pushout: Gateways, Get-aways, and the GED

Eve Tuck

Routledge, 2012

Recent efforts to reform urban high schools have been marked by the pursuit of ever-increasing accountability policies, most notably through the use of high-stakes standardized testing, mayoral control, and secondary school exit exams. Urban Youth and School Pushout excavates the unintended consequences of such policies on secondary school completion by focusing specifically on the use and over-use of the GED credential. Building on a tradition of critical theory and political economy of education, author Eve Tuck offers a provocative analysis of how accountability tacitly and explicitly pushes out under-performing students from the system. By drawing on participatory action research, as well as the work of indigenous scholars and theories, this theoretically and empirically rich book illustrates urban public schooling as a dialectic of humiliating ironies and dangerous dignities. Focusing on the experiences of youth who have been pushed out of their schools under the auspices of obtaining a GED, Tuck reveals new insights on how urban youth view accountability schooling, value the GED, and yearn for multiple, meaningful routes to graduation.

Theory and Educational Research: Toward Critical Social Explanation

Jean Anyon with Michael Dumas, Darla Linville, Kathleen Nolan, Madeline Perez, Eve Tuck & Jen Weiss

Routledge, 2009

Most empirical researchers avoid the use of theory in their studies, providing data but little or no social explanation. Theoreticians, on the other hand, rarely test their ideas with empirical projects. As this groundbreaking volume makes clear, however, neither data nor theory alone is adequate to the task of social explanation—rather they form and inform each other as the inquiry process unfolds. Theory and Educational Research bridges the age-old theory/research divide by demonstrating how researchers can use critical social theory to determine appropriate empirical research strategies, and extend the analytical, critical – and sometimes emancipatory – power of data gathering and interpretation.

Each chapter models a theoretically informed empiricism that places the data research yields in constant conversation with theoretical arsenals of powerful concepts. Personal reflections following each chapter chronicle the contributors’ trajectories of struggle and triumph utilizing theory and its powers in research. In the end this rich collection teaches education scholars how to deliberately engage with critical social theory in research to produce work that is simultaneously theoretically inspired, politically engaged, and empirically evocative.