Making Sense of Movements

January to March 2018


For more information, and to apply: click here

or copy and paste this link into your browser: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfU2Pp0jYhZQ4PYaWqYH_Pxw-Zy7o_akmVJD8hcjjWvlUlEpg/viewform

 

Link to this information in PDF

Making Sense of Movement Flyer JPG Version.jpg

What? Since 2012 and 2013, two social movements have brought attention through mainstream media to injustices endured by Indigenous and Black communities. Starting within months of each other, Idle No More and Black Lives Matter bring awareness to the lack of freedom and self-determination in Indigenous and Black communities, to call out racism and state violence, and to create new conditions of engagement between communities and leaders. They were both founded by women, and have been meaningfully impacted by the leadership of youth.

Both movements have a lot in common the the surface but also have distinct differences. Idle No More has focused on environmental concerns, especially tar sands drilling, broken treaties, and violence against Indigenous women and girls. Black Lives Matter has focused on issues in policing, political representation, and limitations on freedom. Compelling questions emerge when comparing these movements.

The Making Sense of Movements Project seeks to accomplish the following objectives: (1) Understand how Indigenous youth and Black youth are making sense of these two prominent social movements, especially with regard to postsecondary decision-making; (2) Identify connections between injustices against Indigenous youth and Black youth in Toronto, and lay ground for further research addressing reconciliation in Canada.

Who? This study pursues these and other questions by engaging Indigenous youth and Black youth aged 14-18 living in Toronto.

How? This project will engage youth in participatory photography techniques as a way to explore injustices against Black and Indigenous youth, and drawing connections between those injustices. The use of photography is a creative approach that will allow youth to explore their identity and define and contribute to their communities specific to their concerns and priorities. Results from this project will take form as photography displays on a project website, posters, reports to research users, Prezis and other public formats. Photography taken by youth will be used in innovative ways such as screen printing and comic book art, under the guidance of artists.

Why? We are doing research that tries to understand how social movements impact your decision-making and community relationships.  We are doing this research to learn more about what Indigenous and Black youth think about their schools and communities, and the policies that affect them. This study will contribute to future research intent on specifying the implications of these movements for simultaneous processes of reconciliation and inquiry in Canada.

Link to this information in PDF

For more information, and to apply: click here

or copy and paste this link into your browser: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfU2Pp0jYhZQ4PYaWqYH_Pxw-Zy7o_akmVJD8hcjjWvlUlEpg/viewform


Thank you for your interest in the Making Sense of Movements project!

We invite you to participate in a photography and art workshop in collaboration with researchers at University of Toronto to learn about your experiences as youth in Toronto, and your thoughts on your everyday life. The program will use a method called “photovoice,” which involves photography. You will learn how to take pictures, talk about pictures, and write about pictures. In this program, you will be asked questions and you will share stories or ideas about our questions. If there are any discussions or activities you would prefer not to participate in, you can choose not to.

We are doing research that tries to understand how social movements, like Idle No More & Black Lives Matter, impact your decision-making and personal-community relationships. We want to learn more about what Indigenous and Black youth think about their schools and communities, and the programs and policies that affect them.

This project is lead by Dr. Eve Tuck with a research team at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto.

TO BE ELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE:
- Between the age of 14 to 18 years old
- Living in Tkaronto (Toronto or the Greater Toronto Area
- Self-identify as Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, Métis) and/or Black (African-Canadian, Black and Caribbean)
- Consent from a parent or guardian if you are under the age of 18


This project will run from January-March 2018. Meeting dates will be every Mondays and Thursdays, from afterschool until 7pm. Payment is $40 for every 3-hour session.

Please complete the following form by January 9th, 2018. We will follow up with you regarding your application form by January 12th, 2018.